Our massage therapists

Laura Thompson : Tuina therapist et QiGong teacher

In her practice, she uses Hsu Hongchi's Jin Shou Tuina, a practice later passed on to Vince Black, who integrated the use of craniosacral therapy to help the nervous system regain more harmonious patterns. She completed her Tuina certification in 2021 at the Centre de recherche Gongfu de Montréal in Rosemont, and is a member of the Association québécoise des thérapeutes naturels.

Her practice has enabled her to reduce and treat acute and chronic pain associated with problems such as back pain, tendonitis, fibromyalgia and anxiety.

Laura T. seeks to provide a supportive environment where people can feel comfortable expressing themselves, and to enable them to find moments of rest, comfort and presence in their bodies.


Alice / Oli Shiatsu Massage Therapist

His desire to practice shiatsu stemmed from a deep interest in traditional Japanese and Chinese medicine. He is fascinated by the accuracy of this bodily approach, as well as by the space for encounter with oneself that it offers. He trained at the Institut Guijek in 2018, and continues to deepen my knowledge of this age-old art.

Shiatsu is a Japanese therapeutic approach based on the belief that all discomfort stems from an energy imbalance. During sessions, we use mobilization, stretching and pressure to encourage a return to harmony. Treatments take place on the floor, on a futon, fully clothed.

It's important for Oli to offer a space where boundaries, both physical and emotional, are heard and respected.


Dan G. Reid : Tuina therapist

I learned tuina through the North American Tang Shou Tao gongfu lineage, and continued upon graduating to gather complementary skills and techniques such as Japanese acu-moxa, traditional Chinese herbalism, cranial sacral therapy, cupping, Thai foot reflexology, as well as Western manual therapies such as myofacial release, neuromuscular therapy, nerve mobilization, and sports massage. While I learned and often use many great techniques from these Western modalities, they also gave me a greater appreciation for the sophistication of tuina as a complete system that incorporates facets of all the modern manual therapies, while predating them by thousands of years. My interest in tuina and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) came after almost two decades of studying ancient Chinese traditions, including meditation, philosophy, Classical Chinese language (文言文), qigong, music, and the ancient Chinese cosmology and paradigms that evolved into TCM’s understanding of nature’s harmony within the body. As a multi-instrumentalist (guitar, guqin, percussion, xiao flute, erhu), I see tuina as an art similar to music: the body is like a composition filled with melodies that have balanced points of tension and release, the muscles and tendons are like strings that require a precise touch to produce their desired response, and I am the musician who skillfully resolves the melodies, balances the harmonies, and brings the composition toward a feeling of relaxation, wholeness, and completion. My receipts are recognized by Quebec’s private insurers.


Emily : Massage therapist

Emily studied tui na with Ethan Murchie at the Montréal Gongfu Research Centre, where she has also practiced traditional internal martial arts. She was drawn to tui na for its efficacy and elegance, having seen it achieve impressive effects on back issues, shoulder and neck pain, and physical and emotional tension. Her passion is creating welcoming and grounding spaces for the client.
Through tui na, Emily helps alleviate the pain related to ongoing issues like stress and anxiety, which are often less well-targeted by other treatment options. While working at the Clinique d’Acupuntcure Sociale Hochelaga, she is excited to refine her skills in nervous system support using craniosacral therapy, tui na, and other modalities. She has lived in Hochelaga for the past seven years.